*Best of DTB #164* The Sabbath Day debate show notes

Posted by John Benko - March 30th, 2012

These notes are in conjunction with this BlogTalkRadio show.


OPENING STATEMENT




The show notes for this program can be found at http://tinyurl.com/86qysfm. To ask a follow up question, send it to email@deepertruthblog.com
You ever wonder why we celebrate January 1st as the start of our calendar? The reason is that Jesus was born on December 25th and, under the law, a boy was circumcised on the Eighth day. Notice that the Eighth day mentioned here does not have to be a particular day. It is not named in Scripture as being, a particular day. Nevertheless, the Eighth day circumcision was the entrance into the Jewish community and that is why time is measured from January 1st.

The Eighth day signified new life just as surely as the 7th day signified God’s rest. In terms of the week, the Eighth day was the first day, a new beginning. It foreshadowed Sunday. To be specific, Resurrection Sunday, or what we call Easter.

That is why the early Apostles understood that Circumcision was no longer required. What it foreshadowed had been fulfilled.

The same is true of the Sabbath.

God said;

8Remember that thou keep holy the sabbath day.
9Six days shalt thou labour, and shalt do all thy works.
10But on the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: thou shalt do no work on it, thou nor thy son, nor thy daughter, nor thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy beast, nor the stranger that is within thy gates.

11For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, and the sea, and all things
that are in them, and rested on the seventh day: therefore the Lord blessed the
seventh day, and sanctified it.
(Exodus Chapter 20)

7th day Sabbatarians will insist that the Sabbath always explicitly refers Biblically to Saturday. It does not. In Exodus 12:16, the Israelites are commanded to take a Sabbath (or day of rest) on the Seventh day. The Seventh day of the week? No. The Seventh day of the Passover. Well, the passover doesn’t always start on Sunday. In fact, it rarely does. It always starts on 14 Nisan. In 2012, the passover begins on Saturday, making the Seventh day, Friday.

The day of the week of the last day of creation is not named in Scripture. It is simply called The Seventh Day. What is pronounced is that you may work six days and then must rest the seventh. For this to be explicitly Biblically prescribed as a particular weekday day, we would have to know on which day God created the world and start the calendar then.

The word Sabbath is literally translated from Yom Shabbat meaning day of rest. The same Hebrew term is used in Exodus 12, concerning the Seventh day of the Passover and in Exodus 20, concerning the seventh day of the week.

Does this mean that Jews were not required to observe the Saturday Sabbath? By no means.

To understand is to get the relationship between how God’s Covenant law is enforced through the Mosaic law. It was God who demands a 1 day rest out of 7 but it was the Israelites who created the Calendar to implement it.

The Mosaic law was just as binding on a Jew as the moral law but that is not the case today. We are not under the Mosaic law today. The Mosaic law demanded specific Festivals (that is, Yearly commemorations), New Moon (that is, monthly) celebrations and Sabbath (or weekly) commemorations.

All of these, along with circumcision, and prohibitions against certain food and drink were elements of the Mosaic law and shadows of what is to come later. This is clearly shown in Scripture.


Colossians 2
8Beware lest any man cheat you by philosophy, and vain deceit; according to
the tradition of men, according to the elements of the world, and not according
to Christ:
9For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead corporeally;
10And you are filled in him, who is the head of all principality and power:
11In whom also you are circumcised with circumcision not made by hand, in despoiling of the body of the flesh, but in the circumcision of Christ:
12Buried with him in baptism, in whom also you are risen again by the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him up from the dead.

13And you, when you were dead in your sins, and the uncircumcision of your
flesh; he hath quickened together with him, forgiving you all offences:
14Blotting out the handwriting of the decree that was against us, which was contrary to us. And he hath taken the same out of the way, fastening it to the cross:
15And despoiling the principalities and powers, he hath exposed them confidently in open shew, triumphing over them in himself.
16Let no man therefore judge you in meat or in drink, or in respect of a festival day, or of the new moon, or of the sabbaths,
17Which are a shadow of things to come, but the body is of Christ.


The mistake my good friend George makes is the same mistake the the Pharisees made and the same mistake made by contemporary Judaism. They focus too much on carrying the Sabbath much further than God ever intended, without ever grasping it’s meaning or intent.

Jesus said that the Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath (Mark 2:27). The Pharisees, on the other hand, tried to condemn a man for carrying a mat on the Sabbath after He was cured (John 5:8-11)

Jesus was constantly upbraiding the Pharisees for their ultra-legalistic interpretation of the Sabbath at the expense of mercy and the very communion with God the Sabbath was meant to illustrate in Christ’s death. The Pharisees focused on the letter of the law- “dont touch the grain”, “don’t carry your mat” and missed wholly the Spirit of the Law- set time aside for God, put Him first.


Here are some facts and that are not disputable;

  1. The Saturday Sabbath comes from Jewish Holy tradition-the chair of Moses-, not from direct Scripture. This, of course, makes it no less binding and truthful but only upon those under the Old Covenant.
  2. Jeremiah 31 foretells a New Covenant and, Jesus fulfills it in Matthew 26:28.
  3. The Chair of Moses was emphasized by Jesus (Matthew 23:1-3) but it was taken from them and given to another earthly authority. (Matthew 21:42-43)
  4. In the Book of Acts, we see that Church acting with that authority and speaking for the Holy Spirit in abolishing circumcision. (Acts 15:28)

That that authoritative church worshiped on Sunday is a matter quite beyond dispute.

Acts 20:7 On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people and, because he intended to leave the next day, kept on talking until midnight.

1 Corinthians 16: 2 On the first day of every week, each one of you should set aside a sum of money in keeping with his income, saving it up, so that when I come no collections will have to be made.

Further, that the Christian Church, from the very start, up to today, has always observed a Sunday worship cannot be denied (quotes in the show notes). The case that we are still obliged to a Saturday sabbath is wholly without Biblical or historical support.

Keep focused on that.

My opponent will doubtless play the worn-out pagan card alleging that we extrapolated Sunday worship from everything from roman gods to unicorns. He will have no evidence, of course but it will be fun to watch. Detractors of catholicism have lots of boogey men they like to conjure up whenever they are caught in a pickle but it won’t sway our listeners from the plain facts.

God did indeed rest on the 7th day….in the tomb. Death was not the final answer so the shadow was fulfilled.

John wrote his Book of Revelation from the Island of Patmos. He started by saying this;


9 I John, your brother and your partner in tribulation, and in the kingdom, and patience in Christ Jesus, was in the island, which is called Patmos, for the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus.
10 I was in the spirit on the Lord’s day, and heard behind me a great voice, as of a trumpet, (Revelation 1)

Saint Ignatius was a disciple of John and had this to say circa 100 AD;


“If, then, those who had walked in ancient practices attained unto newness of hope, no longer observing Sabbath, but living according to the Lord’s day”

The case that the early church worshiped on Sunday is airtight.



Quotes: Source: catholic.com


The Didache
“But every Lord’s day . . . gather yourselves together and break bread, and give thanksgiving after having confessed your transgressions, that your sacrifice may be pure. But let no one that is at variance with his fellow come together with you, until they be reconciled, that your sacrifice may not be profaned” (Didache 14 [A.D. 70]).
The Letter of Barnabas
“We keep the eighth day [Sunday] with joyfulness, the day also on which Jesus rose again from the dead” (Letter of Barnabas 15:6–8 [A.D. 74]).
Ignatius of Antioch
“[T]hose who were brought up in the ancient order of things [i.e. Jews] have come to the possession of a new hope, no longer observing the Sabbath, but living in the observance of the Lord’s day, on which also our life has sprung up again by him and by his death” (Letter to the Magnesians 8 [A.D. 110]).
Justin Martyr
“[W]e too would observe the fleshly circumcision, and the Sabbaths, and in short all the feasts, if we did not know for what reason they were enjoined [on] you—namely, on account of your transgressions and the hardness of your heart. . . . [H]ow is it, Trypho, that we would not observe those rites which do not harm us—I speak of fleshly circumcision and Sabbaths and feasts? . . . God enjoined you to keep the Sabbath, and imposed on you other precepts for a sign, as I have already said, on account of your unrighteousness and that of your fathers . . .” (Dialogue with Trypho the Jew 18, 21 [A.D. 155]).
“But Sunday is the day on which we all hold our common assembly, because it is the first day on which God, having wrought a change in the darkness and matter, made the world; and Jesus Christ our Savior on the same day rose from the dead” (First Apology 67 [A.D. 155]).
Tertullian
“[L]et him who contends that the Sabbath is still to be observed as a balm of salvation, and circumcision on the eighth day . . . teach us that, for the time past, righteous men kept the Sabbath or practiced circumcision, and were thus rendered ‘friends of God.’ For if circumcision purges a man, since God made Adam uncircumcised, why did he not circumcise him, even after his sinning, if circumcision purges? . . . Therefore, since God originated Adam uncircumcised and unobservant of the Sabbath, consequently his offspring also, Abel, offering him sacrifices, uncircumcised and unobservant of the Sabbath, was by him [God] commended [Gen. 4:1–7, Heb. 11:4]. . . . Noah also, uncircumcised—yes, and unobservant of the Sabbath—God freed from the deluge. For Enoch too, most righteous man, uncircumcised and unobservant of the Sabbath, he translated from this world, who did not first taste death in order that, being a candidate for eternal life, he might show us that we also may, without the burden of the law of Moses, please God” (An Answer to the Jews 2 [A.D. 203]).
The Didascalia
“The apostles further appointed: On the first day of the week let there be service, and the reading of the holy scriptures, and the oblation [sacrifice of the Mass], because on the first day of the week [i.e., Sunday] our Lord rose from the place of the dead, and on the first day of the week he arose upon the world, and on the first day of the week he ascended up to heaven, and on the first day of the week he will appear at last with the angels of heaven” (Didascalia 2 [A.D. 225]).
Origen
“Hence it is not possible that the [day of] rest after the Sabbath should have come into existence from the seventh [day] of our God. On the contrary, it is our Savior who, after the pattern of his own rest, caused us to be made in the likeness of his death, and hence also of his resurrection” (Commentary on John 2:28 [A.D. 229]).
Victorinus
“The sixth day [Friday] is called parasceve, that is to say, the preparation of the kingdom. . . . On this day also, on account of the passion of the Lord Jesus Christ, we make either a station to God or a fast. On the seventh day he rested from all his works, and blessed it, and sanctified it. On the former day we are accustomed to fast rigorously, that on the Lord’s day we may go forth to our bread with giving of thanks. And let the parasceve become a rigorous fast, lest we should appear to observe any Sabbath with the Jews . . . which Sabbath he [Christ] in his body abolished” (The Creation of the World [A.D. 300]).
Eusebius of Caesarea
“They [the early saints of the Old Testament] did not care about circumcision of the body, neither do we [Christians]. They did not care about observing Sabbaths, nor do we. They did not avoid certain kinds of food, neither did they regard the other distinctions which Moses first delivered to their posterity to be observed as symbols; nor do Christians of the present day do such things” (Church History 1:4:8 [A.D. 312]).
“[T]he day of his [Christ’s] light . . . was the day of his resurrection from the dead, which they say, as being the one and only truly holy day and the Lord’s day, is better than any number of days as we ordinarily understand them, and better than the days set apart by the Mosaic law for feasts, new moons, and Sabbaths, which the apostle [Paul] teaches are the shadow of days and not days in reality” (Proof of the Gospel 4:16:186 [A.D. 319]).
Athanasius
“The Sabbath was the end of the first creation, the Lord’s day was the beginning of the second, in which he renewed and restored the old in the same way as he prescribed that they should formerly observe the Sabbath as a memorial of the end of the first things, so we honor the Lord’s day as being the memorial of the new creation” (On Sabbath and Circumcision 3 [A.D. 345]).
Cyril of Jerusalem
“Fall not away either into the sect of the Samaritans or into Judaism, for Jesus Christ has henceforth ransomed you. Stand aloof from all observance of Sabbaths and from calling any indifferent meats common or unclean” (Catechetical Lectures 4:37 [A.D. 350]).
Council of Laodicea
“Christians should not Judaize and should not be idle on the Sabbath, but should work on that day; they should, however, particularly reverence the Lord’s day and, if possible, not work on it, because they were Christians” (Canon 29 [A.D. 360]).
John Chrysostom
“[W]hen he [God] said, ‘You shall not kill’ . . . he did not add, ‘because murder is a wicked thing.’ The reason was that conscience had taught this beforehand, and he speaks thus, as to those who know and understand the point. Wherefore when he speaks to us of another commandment, not known to us by the dictate of conscience, he not only prohibits, but adds the reason. When, for instance, he gave commandment concerning the Sabbath— ‘On the seventh day you shall do no work’—he subjoined also the reason for this cessation. What was this? ‘Because on the seventh day God rested from all his works which he had begun to make’ [Ex. 20:10-11]. . . . For what purpose then, I ask, did he add a reason respecting the Sabbath, but did no such thing in regard to murder? Because this commandment was not one of the leading ones. It was not one of those which were accurately defined of our conscience, but a kind of partial and temporary one, and for this reason it was abolished afterward. But those which are necessary and uphold our life are the following: ‘You shall not kill. . . . You shall not commit adultery. . . . You shall not steal.’ On this account he adds no reason in this case, nor enters into any instruction on the matter, but is content with the bare prohibition” (Homilies on the Statutes 12:9 [A.D. 387]).
“You have put on Christ, you have become a member of the Lord and been enrolled in the heavenly city, and you still grovel in the law [of Moses]? How is it possible for you to obtain the kingdom? Listen to Paul’s words, that the observance of the law overthrows the gospel, and learn, if you will, how this comes to pass, and tremble, and shun this pitfall. Why do you keep the Sabbath and fast with the Jews?” (Homilies on Galatians 2:17 [A.D. 395]).
“The rite of circumcision was venerable in the Jews’ account, forasmuch as the law itself gave way thereto, and the Sabbath was less esteemed than circumcision. For that circumcision might be performed, the Sabbath was broken; but that the Sabbath might be kept, circumcision was never broken; and mark, I pray, the dispensation of God. This is found to be even more solemn than the Sabbath, as not being omitted at certain times. When then it is done away, much more is the Sabbath” (Homilies on Philippians 10 [A.D. 402]).
The Apostolic Constitutions
“And on the day of our Lord’s resurrection, which is the Lord’s day, meet more diligently, sending praise to God that made the universe by Jesus, and sent him to us, and condescended to let him suffer, and raised him from the dead. Otherwise what apology will he make to God who does not assemble on that day . . . in which is performed the reading of the prophets, the preaching of the gospel, the oblation of the sacrifice, the gift of the holy food” (Apostolic Constitutions 2:7:60 [A.D. 400]).
Augustine
“Well, now, I should like to be told what there is in these ten commandments, except the observance of the Sabbath, which ought not to be kept by a Christian. . . . Which of these commandments would anyone say that the Christian ought not to keep? It is possible to contend that it is not the law which was written on those two tables that the apostle [Paul] describes as ‘the letter that kills’ [2 Cor. 3:6], but the law of circumcision and the other sacred rites which are now abolished” (The Spirit and the Letter 24 [A.D. 412]).
Pope Gregory I
“It has come to my ears that certain men of perverse spirit have sown among you some things that are wrong and opposed to the holy faith, so as to forbid any work being done on the Sabbath day. What else can I call these [men] but preachers of Antichrist, who when he comes will cause the Sabbath day as well as the Lord’s day to be kept free from all work. For because he [the Antichrist] pretends to die and rise again, he wishes the Lord’s day to be held in reverence; and because he compels the people to Judaize that he may bring back the outward rite of the law, and subject the perfidy of the Jews to himself, he wishes the Sabbath to be observed. For this which is said by the prophet, ‘You shall bring in no burden through your gates on the Sabbath day’ [Jer. 17:24] could be held to as long as it was lawful for the law to be observed according to the letter. But after that the grace of almighty God, our Lord Jesus Christ, has appeared, the commandments of the law which were spoken figuratively cannot be kept according to the letter. For if anyone says that this about the Sabbath is to be kept, he must needs say that carnal sacrifices are to be offered. He must say too that the commandment about the circumcision of the body is still to be retained. But let him hear the apostle Paul saying in opposition to him: ‘If you be circumcised, Christ will profit you nothing’ [Gal. 5:2]” (Letters 13:1 [A.D. 597]).


Closing remarks

The show notes for this program can be found at http://tinyurl.com/86qysfm. To ask a follow up question, send it to email@deepertruthblog.com.
At the end of the day, 7th day sabbatarians are right about one point. It does come down to an issue of authority. The infant church either did have the authority to declare the Sabbath Day fulfilled and initiate the Lord’s Day in it’s place, or they didn’t. It is my position, the catholic position and, frankly, the position of the overwhelming majority of Sunday worship Christians, that they did.

This cannot help but be a touchstone onto the larger issue of Sola Scriptura, which we deal with in a future debate. Obviously, we cannot address it now.

Let me at least say this though. I believe George is a decent person. I really do. He was a police officer and people just don’t generally go into that type of field unless they have courage and integrity. Does George want to love and serve Jesus Christ? I have no doubt. However, he needs to study a lot more from grounded sources.

Hosea Chapter 4 says;

My people perish for want of knowledge! Since you have rejected knowledge, I will reject you from my priesthood; Since you have ignored the law of your God, I will also ignore your sons.

I’m trying to make a point here without drifting to far afield from the direct subject and risk getting busted down by the moderator but it is next to impossible to understand doctrines like the Sabbath unless you have a fundamental understanding of Covenant Theology. The Old Testament exists for a reason. We learn God’s Covenant plan through the Old Testament and we fulfill it in the New Testament.

One of the Old Testament’s lesson is the authority to bind and loose. Here are two examples;

Matthew 23: 1 Then Jesus spoke to the multitudes and to his disciples,
2 Saying: The scribes and the Pharisees have sitten on the chair of Moses.
3 All things therefore whatsoever they shall say to you, observe and do: but according to their works. do ye not; for they say, and do not.

Matthew 19:

3 Some Pharisees approached him, and tested him, 4 saying, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife for any cause whatever?”
4 He said in reply, “Have you not read that from the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female’
5 and said, ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh’?
6 So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore, what God has joined together, no human being must separate.”
7 They said to him, “Then why did Moses command that the man give the woman a bill of divorce and dismiss (her)?”
8 He said to them, “Because of the hardness of your hearts Moses allowed you to divorce your wives, but from the beginning it was not so.

It takes work to understand this. God gave the Old Testament Church the authority to makes many decisions on His behalf. Clearly, He gave the New testament church this same authority.

In Matthew 16 and 18, Jesus says the Church is the final authority to rule on matters of sin and to bind and loose. In Luke 10:16, He gave that church the power to speak for Him, saying “He who hears you, hears Me. He who rejects you, rejects me. He who rejects me rejects Him who sent me”. The church has spoken. Sunday is our day of worship.

Thank You.


George’s opening statement

Opening Statement: The Sabbath Day, March 30, 2012
by George Lujack

The Sabbath commandment is one of the most misunderstood commandments of Scripture. Before getting into what day the weekly Sabbath should be observed on, I’d like to first define how the Sabbath should be observed.

1. It is a day of rest from weekly labor. No work should be done on this day. That said, it is not a sin to do essential services such as medical care, and emergency response work, nor is it wrong to come to the aid of a stranger. Christ taught that it is not wrong to do good deeds on the Sabbath.

2. It is a day to not buy and sell or trade in whatever manner in the marketplace, for entertainment or for whatever purpose. Purchases for food and essentials should be made in advance, before the Sabbath – in preparation for the Sabbath, so that they are available when the Sabbath arrives.

3. It is a day of reverence to God. It is a day to honor God and not do our own pleasure (Isaiah 58:13).

Beginning Friday at sundown through Saturday at sundown is the seventh day Sabbath, according to how God counted days during the creation week. The purpose of the Sabbath is for a time set aside for physical rest and spiritual refreshment, a time to ponder and give thanks for the wonder of God’s creation.

God did not give man the option to observe the Sabbath as a mater of his own choosing. Church fellowship and attendance is by no means not the solitary way of keeping the Sabbath, but revering and choosing Sunday over Saturday as a special day to honor God is not in accordance with keeping the Sabbath.

A person cannot observe the Sabbath every day of the week, as some say they do, in denying God’s seventh-day Sabbath. That would mean that they never purchase or sell anything nor do any work and revere God ceaselessly. This would not be practical and God does not want us to observe the Sabbath in such a manner as we choose.

Jesus and the disciples were often accused of breaking the Sabbath. In Luke chapter 6, the Pharisees accused Jesus’ disciples of plucking grains and eating them on the Sabbath, considering this “work.” It is not unlawful to eat on the Sabbath. The disciples were hungry and were eating as they passed through a grain field. The law also states that it is unlawful to muzzle an ox while it treads out the grain (Deuteronomy 25:4; 1 Corinthians 9:9; 1 Timothy 5:18). What the Pharisees were doing was treating Jesus’ disciples worse that field oxen.

Now if the disciples had been in the field gathering grain for a weekly harvest, the Pharisees would have been correct in accusing them of breaking the Sabbath, as this would constitute labor. A man was once put to death under the law for gathering sticks on the Sabbath day (Numbers 16:32).

Observant Sabbath keeping Jews, I would say, err in some ways in which they keep the Sabbath. Following in their own traditions of man, many modern day Sabbath observing Jews do such things as not using electricity on the Sabbath, taking their phones off the receivers – so they cannot receive calls, and placing tape on the light switch on inside of their refrigerator – so that when they open their refrigerator door, the interior light will not go on. Yet they leave their refrigerators plugged in so that the food contained inside will not spoil.

This is going too far in Sabbath observation, because Jesus said that the Sabbath was made to serve man, not man to serve the Sabbath (Mark 2:27). The sun keeps shining on the Sabbath. The earth does not stop spinning on the Sabbath. Observant Jew’s non-use of electricity, telephone, internet, and motor vehicle transport on the Sabbath are doctrine of men observances of the Sabbath, not commands of God in honoring the Sabbath. What would be considered harder “work” or labor, a Jewish family walking 2-miles to a synagogue and returning on foot on the Sabbath, or that same Jewish family traveling by automobile to their synagogue and returning by their car? I would say that if the family traveled with their car, they would be resting more than if they traveled by foot, therefore “resting” according to the Sabbath.

The seventh day Sabbath was instituted by God after creation.

GENESIS 2:1-3:
Thus the heavens and the earth, and all the host of them. were finished. And on the seventh day God ended His work which He had done, and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had done. Then God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it, because in it He rested from all His work which God had created and made.

God included the Sabbath in the Ten Commandments with guidelines of how to observe the day that He sanctified…

EXODUS 20:6-11:
Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, 10but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it.

EXODUS 31:12-18:
And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak also to the children of Israel, saying: ‘Surely My Sabbaths you shall keep, for it is a sign between Me and you throughout your generations, that you may know that I am the Lord who sanctifies you. You shall keep the Sabbath, therefore, for it is holy to you. Everyone who profanes it shall surely be put to death; for whoever does any work on it, that person shall be cut off from among his people. Work shall be done for six days, but the seventh is the Sabbath of rest, holy to the Lord. Whoever does any work on the Sabbath day, he shall surely be put to death. Therefore the children of Israel shall keep the Sabbath, to observe the Sabbath throughout their generations as a perpetual covenant. It is a sign between Me and the children of Israel forever; for in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, and on the seventh day He rested and was refreshed.’”
And when He had made an end of speaking with him on Mount Sinai, He gave Moses two tablets of the Testimony, tablets of stone, written with the finger of God.

The seventh day Sabbath is a perpetual covenant and everlasting sign according to Exodus 31:16-17 officially written with the finger of God according to Exodus 31:18!

History reveals that it was decades after the death of the apostles that a politico-religious system, Catholicism supported by Rome, repudiated the Sabbath of Scripture and substituted the observance of the first day of the week in its place.

The Catholic Church altered the actual Sabbath commandment issued from God – written with God’s own finger and recorded in Exodus 20:6, which states, “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.” Catholicism reworded God’s commandment to state, “Remember to keep holy the Sabbath day.” Then they renamed the Sabbath day to Sunday!

By their own admission, the Catholic Church, without any indication from Scripture, changed the Sabbath day from Saturday to Sunday.

The Catholic Church claims a few reasons why they intended to change the Saturday Sabbath to Sunday….

1. They believe Christ rose on Sunday, and this somehow gives them license to change the perpetual Sabbath day from Saturday to Sunday.

2. They believe that the change was part of their “divine mission,” an act of their ecclesiastical power and authority in religious matters.

The Catholic Church does not acknowledge other more sinister reasons reasons why they intended to change the Saturday Sabbath to …

1. Sunday worship is the traditional pagan day of worship.

2. The Catholic Church wanted to differentiate themselves from the Jews; refusing to worship on the same day the Jews did.

God ordained baptism to honor the resurrection, not the Sunday Sabbath according to Romans 6:3-5.

The Catholic Church in statements through the centuries, freely admit that they are responsible, without any direction from Scripture, for intending to change God’s Sabbath day from Saturday to Sunday.

Catholic spokespersons, in their own words:

“The Catholic Church, . . . by virtue of her divine mission, changed the day from Saturday to Sunday.” The Catholic Mirror, official publication of James Cardinal Gibbons, Sept. 23, 1893.

“But you may read the Bible from Genesis to Revelation, and you will not find a single line authorizing the sanctification of Sunday. The Scriptures enforce the religious observance of Saturday, a day which we never sanctify.” – James Cardinal Gibbons, The Faith of our Fathers, 88th ed., pp. 89.

“The Catholic Church took the pagan Sunday and made it the Christian Sunday…And thus the pagan Sunday, dedicated to Balder (a pagan god) became the Christian Sunday, sacred to Christ.” – Catholic World, March, 1894.”

“Perhaps the boldest thing, the most revolutionary change the church ever did happened in the first century. The holy day, the Sabbath, was changed from Saturday to Sunday not from any directions noted in the Scriptures, but from the Catholic Church’s sense of its own power. – Saint Catherine Catholic Church Sentinel, May 21, 1995.

“Question: Have you any other way of proving that the Church has power to institute festivals of precept?
“Answer: Had she not such power, she could not have done that in which all modern religionists agree with her-she could not have substituted the observance of Sunday, the first day of the week, for the observance of Saturday, the seventh day, a change for which there is no Scriptural authority.” – Stephen Keenan, A Doctrinal Catechism 3rd ed., p. 174.

“The Bible says, ‘Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.’ The Catholic Church says, No! By my divine power I abolished the Sabbath day, and command you to keep the first day of the week. And lo, the entire civilized world bows down in reverent obedience to the command of the holy Catholic Church!” – Father Enright, C.S.S.R. of the Redemptoral College, Kansas City, MO as taken from the History of the Sabbath, p.802.

Well, this is one Christian who will not bow, nor obey the commands of the Catholic Church, but will obey the perpetual command of God, to remember the seventh day as the Sabbath day.


Closing Statement by George Lujack


March 30, 2012

In closing, I would just like to state the obvious about the attempt to change God’s perpetual commands, including but not limited to the weekly Sabbath day.

DANIEL 7:25:
He shall speak pompous words against the Most High, shall persecute the saints of the Most High, and shall intend to change times and law.

The office holder known as the Catholic Pope (all of them) has fulfilled this prophecy. All Catholic popes have either INTENDED to change God’s laws or have upheld the intended changes of Catholic popes that came before them.

Notice how Scripture says, “He … shall INTEND to change times and law.”

The Catholic pope CANNOT change God’s times and laws, though that is his intention. God’s times and laws REMAIN as God originally commanded them.

Therefore the seventh day Saturday Sabbath remains, no matter how many churches and people wish to observe Sunday instead.

MALACHI 3:6:
For I am the Lord, I do not change…

HEBREWS 13:8:
Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

PSALM 111:7-8:
The works of His hands are verity and judgment; all His commandments are sure. They stand fast forever and ever and are done in truth and uprightness.

ISAIAH 24:5:
The earth is also defiled under its inhabitants, because they have transgressed the laws, changed the ordinance, broken the everlasting covenant.

The seventh day Saturday Sabbath is a perpetual unchangeable command, written with the finger of God (Exodus 31:12-18).

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*BEST OF DTB #119* The real message of Christmas

Posted by John Benko - December 25th, 2011

Life changes fast, doesn’t it. This Christmas day is my 48th but it is the first one in which there were no presents under our tree on Christmas morning. Very strange. Christmas morning next year is likely to be the second, as we hope to celebrate Midnight Mass in the church built over the very spot where our beloved Savior was born in Bethlehem, more than 2 Millenniums past.

To a disbelieving world, our faith seems rather peculiar and bizarre and, to be quite frank,we quarrel enough amongst ourselves to give them cause to make sport of it. “Some King you have” they must think, “born in a place where animals feed, scorned and ridiculed by some of His own relatives, crucified for a crime He did not commit so His followers could fight amongst themselves for 2,000 years”.

Laugh if you must, but I take great comfort from the fact that I have a King that wants to meet where I am. Especially since I could not hope to reach Him.

For those pondering how they might find God, if He exists, the journey would logically begin as an intellectual pursuit. Where should I begin to look? would be an understandable starting point but it would lead to an equally understandable frustration, for there is no shortage of deities laying claim and no shortage of sects within each religion. How could one hope to find God?

One can’t by oneself, and that is just the point of Christmas. You cannot find God. You must seek Him, then let God find you, knowing in your heart, that He will, if you will only let Him.

That, my friends, is the real message of Christmas. We could not find God, so He found us. We could not justify ourselves before God, so mercy found us. We could not see through the darkness, so light found us. If you have ever been lost in the woods at night, you know what I am talking about.

If you cannot find God, be still and believe, and let Him find you. Then, and only then, can you fully apprehend the miracle that is Christmas. Until you apprehend the miracle of Christmas, solving the riddle that is life is hopeless and your life, regardless of how prosperous, or tragic, will be nothing more than vaporous vanity.

In solving the message of Christmas, the message of life is solved and even the most painful life, plods on with perserverence and hope, and ends in rapturous joy.

The message of Christmas is how God chose to deal with sin and the misery caused by it. The blight of sin caused paradise on earth to be exchanged for a cold, lost and dying place. God’s Justice makes removing that penalty impossible and so, each day, we suffer and we watch others suffer.

The shocking and piercing reality of God’s love for us, as Jennifer Fulwiler (former atheist turned Catholic) so brilliantly put it, was that God’s response to suffering was not to eliminate it but to plunge Himself right into the middle of it.

So, Jesus did not choose to remove the chill from the night air around Bethlehem, He chose to be a baby, shivering in that air just like the shepherds. To a helpless world, He came as a helpless child. He was like us in all things except sin.

All things means all things. Have you ever felt frustrated? sad? grief-stricken? abandoned? God is with us in all these things.

A few year’s ago, a very blasphemous song came out called
What if God was one of us?

If God had a name, what would it be?
and would you call it to His face?
If you were faced with Him, in all His glory,
what would you ask, if you
had just one question?

and yeah, yeah, God is good
and yeah, yeah, God is great,
and yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

What if God was one of us?
Just a slob like one of us.
Just a stranger on the bus.
trying to make His way home.

If God had a face, what would it look
like and would you want to see,
if seeing meant that you would have to
believe in things like heaven and in Jesus and the saints,
and all the prophets?

and yeah, yeah, God is good
and yeah, yeah, God is great
and yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah,

What if God was one of us,
just a slob like one of us,
just a stranger on the bus,
trying to make his way home,
nobody calling on the phone,
except for the Pope, maybe in Rome?

The point of this song is to suggest that, even if there is a God, it is of no benefit because He cannot relate to me. God is up there, with Jesus and all the saints and the prophets and we are down here. The message of the song is that God is, in fact, not one of us. The message of Christmas is that God, in the person of Jesus, in a stunningly real way, is one of us.

The entire dilemma is played out in the Crucifixion scene where you see, in dramatic fashion, the suffering of Christ and the right response contrasted with the suffering of Christ and the wrong response. It is more than just claiming faith in Jesus, in mere words.

The bad thief told Jesus, in so many words; You cannot be God because I suffer. The good thief said, in so many words; Yes, I suffer, Yet, you are God.

Atheists often argue that if God cannot remove all suffering from the world, He is either not all-powerful or He is not just.

They rationalize that if a merciful God has power over the world, in which He reigns, He cannot fail to eliminate suffering. Therefore, since He cannot do this, they choose not to believe. They have it backwards. Unbelief is not caused by suffering. Suffering is caused by unbelief. It is a disbelieving world that has pushed God’s mercy aside and cast their lot with Satan. If this world is choosing Satan, God’s Justice demands that the world understand the consequences of that decision. If you let the roaring lion out of the cage and he devours an innocent child, can you blame anyone but yourself for the child’s death?

In the same way, each one of us bears at least some responsibility in fostering a culture of darkness or a culture of light. Is it rational to think it unjust that an innocent child suffers and dies or that a loving father is killed in a car accident? Yes, it is rational to feel that way. It can even be commendable, to a point.

Sure, it is less selfish to ask where God is because my family member suffers than to say where is He because I, myself suffer. It is less selfish still, to ask why innocent children and strangers suffer.

Yet, words are not enough. God is not indifferent to the suffering of the innocents but it is not God preventing God from healing, it is man. For God is not only One of Us but One with Us.

So, when we see so much suffering in the world and we accuse God Why do you see all this suffering and do nothing?, expect the index finger of God to point back at you, as He charges you with the same question. This is the miracle of Christmas and the miracle of Christianity and the message of the cross. To the bad thief, Jesus may say;

My child, right now, I cannot remove your suffering. You may not understand
why at this time but your suffering is the result of sin- your sins, and the sins of
others.

My justice demands that I must passively allow your suffering for a season
but I would not do so, even for a second, If I were not able to bring from it, a
greater good.

So, my child, though I cannot end your suffering right now, I choose, for
love of you, to join you in it. Yes, I am able to take us both down from the
cross, but then, how would I save you? So, I choose to suffer, not to prevent
you from suffering, but to join you in it and give it immeasurable
value.

As humans, we can suffer and we will suffer. We suffer in different ways and to different degrees and for different durations. Some complain bitterly over even the smallest sufferings and some show awe inspiring courage, in the face of unimaginable suffering. Suffering is a fact of life. What differs is the response to suffering and that is both a response to the unimaginable love of God and the equally incomprehensible malevolence of the destroyer. Both are played out in the Holy season we call Christmas and beyond.

On Christmas day, we celebrate the child who would embrace suffering to fuse Divinity and humanity in the most selfless act of love the world has ever seen, and will ever see. Three days later, we lament the slaughter of the Holy innocents, those who had to die at the bloody hands of Herod who gave himself wholly over the malevolence and pride of the evil one.

The former says to the guilty I must suffer and die, so you can live, the latter says to the innocent, you must suffer and die, so that I can live as I want.

Two responses to the person of Christ. The first is reflected in the true love of God exemplified by a grieving parent watching their child suffer, wishing they could trade places. The second, by a child molester mopping up his selfish and disgusting urge with an innocent child. Though these are polar extremes, the truth should not fail to meet you where you are.
For each day, you choose, of your own free will, to heal suffering, to cause suffering or to be indifferent to suffering. Only the first leads to Heaven, where suffering is vanquished. The others lead to hell, where souls are plunged in a universe of suffering.

Jesus does not desire that last, tragic end for us. In fact, so much does He desire rescuing us from the fire that He came down here to be with us and like us. Many of my protestant friends have it wrong. They think salvation is something Jesus does for us. No, it is something Jesus does with us, uniting our sufferings to His and working out our salvation through us. (Colossians 1:24-25, Phillipians 2:12)

Jesus is one of us. That is the message of Christmas. That is the message of Christianity and that is the message of the Catholic church. We could not find Him, He found us. We could not stretch up to reach Him, He stooped down to reach us. Our suffering is in vain, He gave it value. If Jesus is not in your life, it is not because He does not knock, it is because you do not answer. You do not seek Him and you do not answer when He seeks you.
The Angels appeared to the shepherds and proclaimed the good news for all people…..even the stranger on the bus.

So, my Christmas wish to those who hold Him dear is that you will stoke that flame and make it burn hotter and brighter that others may see it. To those who had Him and lost Him, try TRY to find Him again. He did not leave you nor forsake you. He was with you when you suffered and He did not give up on you when you failed Him. Search again for Him who is your only hope. To those who never had Him (or only did with a shallow effort), give us a chance to show Him to you. If you will only attempt to come to understand why this time and this faith, is so sacred to us, we will try to find you where you are and show you how to become whole.

Merry Christmas



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*BEST OF DTB #115* The case for December 25th, 2 BC- The video

Posted by John Benko - December 12th, 2011

We are so proud to present this to you. We hope it makes your Christmas more Merry.

There are some that question the efficacy of such an effort on the grounds that it really doesn’t matter when Jesus was born, only that He was.

There is merit to the argument up to a point.

Where the argument loses it salience is when the difficulties presented call into question the reliability of the early church fathers, or even the fact that Jesus Christ was a historical person after all.

Those difficulties have long hinged around a number of popular misconceptions about the dates of some of the Gospel events. For example;

  1. It has long been assumed by many that Herod the Great died in 4 BC but this conclusion is
    simply untenable, given the evidence we have. A far more compelling case points to January 1BC.
  2. The issue of Quirinius as Governing Syria. His reign did not commence until 6 AD. Many point to this, and point # 1 as making Christ’s birth impossible to reconcile. Knowing that Quirinius would have been governing temporarily, in 2 BC, removes this objection.
  3. Zechariah’s appearance in the Temple was not according to the rotation established in 1 Chronicles 24, which begins on 1 Nisan but rather on the one that was set after the temple was rebuilt by Zerubbabel. This rotation begins on Tisha B’ AV

These, and other facts, clear up the complications and show, quite clearly, that the early church knew what it was talking about. The gospel accounts are not fairy tales, they are true historical events. This should give pause to the misguided folks who say that Christmas is more about the sun god than the Son of God. That you establish the date of December 25 as belonging to Mithros or Nimrod orfalling during Saturnalia means nothing to me. The only point of contention is whether Jesus was, or was not, born on this date. The answer to that question must rest on the merits and not on who else lays claim to the date.

At the end of the day, we believe we have established December 25th, 2 BC as the only plausible date that fits the totality of the evidence. Unless someone can counter this conclusion with unimpeachable evidence, juxtaposing us against Mithros will result in a yawn.

The larger question is what this means for you. If this baby was born when we say He was, than you may just have to accept that He is who we say He is. What are you going to do with that revelation? Will you continue to remain frozen in denial or will yearning impulses move you to explore the potential reality of this possibility? If this boy child be God made flesh, it is reasonable of you to conclude that there must be some tangible evidence of this. Yet, if the evidence did exist, it is just as reasonable to conclude that you would incur guilt in making no effort to seek it out.

Yes, the reality that the Christmas story just might be a true story may shake you from your atrophy and place you on a new, exciting, and sometimes challenging path….

….but is that really such a bad thing after all?


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